Hackers can steal your passwords via your wireless mouse, study finds

Aaron Sankin wrote "Hackers can steal your passwords via your wireless mouse, study finds" on Mar 25, 2015. The report is based on our accepted TDSC (IEEE Transactions on Dependable and Secure Computing) paper "Password Extraction via Reconstructed Wireless Mouse Trajectory".

CCTV 10 Broadcast!

CCTV 10 is the State Science and Education Channel of China. They broadcast a 25-minute program about our research at 8:34AM EST on June 4, 2015. They interviewed us in December, 2014. The program was broadcast in the China Cyber Security Awareness Week and is a jointed program between CCTV 10 and Office of the Central Leading Group for Cyberspace Affairs.

Team UMass Lowell interviewed by CCTV

Team UMass Lowell, Ph.D student Qinggang Yue, Prof. Benyuan Liu and Prof. Xinwen Fu were interviewed by the science and education channel of the CCTV (China Central Television), i.e. CCTV 10, from Dec. 16 ~ 18, at Southeast University, Nanjing, China. The participants also included our collaborators, Dr. Zhen Ling from Southeast University and Dr. Bill Chen from University of Macau. A 25-minute program on mobile security and privacy will be produced from the 3-day interview.

10.25.06 Get Protected from Cyber Threats

10.25.06 Get Protected from Cyber Threats

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month, and it’s a good time to make sure you’re protected from the latest dangers lurking in cyberspace.

Among the risks:
… Malicious code—viruses, worms, Trojan horses, etc.—that can disable and even take over your computer without your knowledge;
… Pedophiles who prowl the web, looking to exploit your kids;

10.04.06 10th Annual InfraGard Summit

10.04.06 10th Annual InfraGard Summit

The president of Shell Oil was there. So were high-ranking execs from across government—the Secretary of Agriculture, a top Department of Homeland Security official, and the FBI’s cyber chief, to name a few.

Not to mention hundreds of public and private sector professionals—business leaders, entrepreneurs, military and government officials, computer security experts, academics, and state and local law enforcement.

08.21.06 Advice from FBI Agent Jeff Lanza

08.21.06 Advice from FBI Agent Jeff Lanza

“I’ve always wanted a plasma television. High-def, of course. I think I’ll buy the most expensive model I can find. Why should I worry about what it costs? It’s free, at least for me.”

07.10.06 Protect Your Workplace

07.10.06 Protect Your Workplace

What if we told you there’s a way you can improve security at your workplace…today? That it’s fast, easy, and completely free? And that it will not only enhance your personal safety on the job…but also help ensure the financial health of your organization?

It’s all true—thanks to a new “Protect Your Workplace” campaign launched by the Department of Homeland Security and the FBI.

07.05.06 A Cautionary Tale - Online Job Scams

07.05.06 A Cautionary Tale - Online Job Scams

In the market for a new job? The Internet has made it easier than ever to find one. It’s also made it easier for criminals to find you.

Think about it: what do you do when you apply for a job? You give out all kinds of personal information: your name, address, home and work telephone numbers, e-mail addresses, sometimes even your date of birth and social security number. Just what you’d want to know if you’re an identity thief or other criminal.

06.30.06 N.Y. Rolls Up Movie Piracy Rings

06.30.06 N.Y. Rolls Up Movie Piracy Rings

It’s the first thing you see on movie DVDs and tapes: the FBI anti-piracy warning that leaves little room for interpretation: “The unauthorized reproduction or distribution of this copyrighted work is illegal.” So it was “no small irony,” as the FBI’s top agent in New York said in a June 28 news conference, that agents raiding two huge movie piracy rings discovered the FBI’s warning neatly appended to a cache of bootleg movies.

06.28.06 Center for Identity Management and Information Protection (CIMIP)

06.28.06 Center for Identity Management and Information Protection (CIMIP)

It costs American businesses and consumers a reported $50 billion a year, causes untold headaches for an estimated 10 million U.S. victims annually, and even makes it easier for terrorists and spies to launch attacks against our nation.